Giddha Dance



During Lohri occasion, the Punjabi women revelling joy, give vent to their suppressed feelings in a male dominated society through the Giddha. Slogans known as bolis are sung while dancing which exhibit the deep human feeling. These bolis cover varied themes from nature to excesses committed by the husband and his relatives, some talk about love affairs to the loneliness of a bride separated from her groom. The Punjabi salwar kameez or lehnga, rich in color and decoration is worn. No musical instruments except perhaps a dholak accompanies a Giddha.

Giddha The dance is derived from the ancient ring dance. One of the girls plays on the drum or 'dholki' while others form a circle. Some times even the dholki is dispensed with. While moving in a circle, the girls raise their hands to the level of their shoulders and clap their hands in unison. Then they strike their palms against those of their neighbors. Rhythm is generally provided by clapping of hands.

Giddha is a very vigorous folk dance and like other such dances it is very much an affair of the legs. So quick is the movement of the feet in its faster parts that it is difficult for the spectator even to wink till the tempo falls again. The embroidered 'duppattas' and heavy jewelry of the participants whose number is unrestricted further exaggerate the movements.

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